B-STEM INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 0000G ( Official )
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B-STEM INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 0000G ( Official )
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B-STEM INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 0000G ( Official )

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SECTION A

 

1. Division:

  Sciences & Mathematics

2. Course Discipline:

  MATH

3. Course Number:

  0000G

4. Course Title:

  B-STEM INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA

5. First semester this new version/new course will be offered: Fall 2018



 

 

SECTION B

General Course Information

 

1. Units: 5.0                 Variable units N/A

2. This Course is:

Degree-Applicable Credit - Non-Transferable

 

3A.  Cross-List: 

  

3B.  Formerly:

  

 

 

Course Format and Duration

 

4. Standard Term Hrs per Wk

      

5. Standard Term Total Semester Hrs

Lecture/Discussion:  

               5

 

Lecture/Discussion:  

              90

Laboratory:

                 

 

Laboratory:

                 

Activity:

                 

 

Activity:

                 

By Arrangement:

                 

 

By Arrangement:

                 

Total Hrs per Wk

               5

 

Total Hrs

              90

 

6. Minimum hours per week of independent work done outside of class:    10

 

Course Preparation – (Supplemental form B required)

 

7a. Prerequisite(s): (Course and/or other preparation/experience that is REQUIRED to be completed previous to enrollment in this course.)


    

7b. Co-requisite(s):  (Courses and/or other preparation that is REQUIRED to be taken concurrently with this course.)


    

7c. Advisory: (Minimum preparation RECOMMENDED in order to be successful in this course.  Also known as “Course Advisory”.)


    

 

 

Catalog Description And Other Catalog Information

 

8. Repeatability:

Not Repeatable

Please Note: 8. (Repeatability) does not refer to repeating courses because of substandard grades or a lapse of time since the student took the course. A course may be repeated only if the course content differs each time it is offered and the student who repeats it is gaining an expanded educational experience as stipulated in Title 5.

 

Skills or proficiencies are enhanced by supervised repetition and practice within class periods.

Active participatory experience in individual study or group assignments is the basic means by which course objectives are attained.

Course content differs each time it is offered.

 

Explanation for above repeatability selection:


    

9a. Grading Option:

Standard Grade

9b. Catalog Description:

B-STEM Intermediate Algebra is a one semester course for business, science, technology, engineering and math majors covering the topics of linear equations and applications, absolute value equations and inequalities, factoring, operations on rational and radical expressions, functions including composition and inverses, quadratic functions and graphs, exponential and logarithmic expressions and equations, and systems of equations. Computational techniques developed in beginning algebra are prerequisite skills for this course. This course is appropriate for students on a business or STEM pathway and have some knowledge of beginning algebra or who have had at least two years of high school algebra but have not used it for several years.

    

 

 

Course Outline Information

 

10. Course Objectives: (Course objectives for all credit courses must indicate that students will learn critical thinking and will be able to apply concepts at college level.  Course objectives must be related to items listed in Section 11.)

1. Solve equations including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational and absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, or radical, and their associated applied problems.
2. Solve inequalities including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational and absolute value.
3. Analyze and determine the domain for polynomial, radical, rational, logarithmic and exponential functions.
4. Graph linear, absolute value, quadratic, radical, exponential, logarithmic and piecewise functions.
5. Write equations from graphs of linear and quadratic functions.
6. Utilize function notation, perform operations on functions, determine if a function is invertible, and find the inverse of functions both graphically and in function notation.
7. Use graphic, numeric and analytic methods to solve linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, applying technology when appropriate.
8. Simplify and perform operations on complex numbers and solve equations with non-real solutions.
9. Simplify and perform operations on algebraic expressions including polynomials, rational expressions, complex fractions, radicals, rational and integral exponents, and logarithms.
10. Solve linear and nonlinear systems of equations and inequalities with two variables and applied problems associated with such systems, including finding feasible regions.
11. Solve linear systems of equations with three variables and applied problems associated with such systems.
12. Graph and write equations of the elementary conic sections: parabola and circle.
13. Demonstrate fluency with mathematical vocabulary, terminology, and notation through written and oral presentation.
14. Implement student-specific learning strategies and study techniques.

    

11. Course Content Outline: (Provides a comprehensive, sequential outline of the course content, including all major subject matter and the specific body of knowledge covered.)

I. Simplify or reorganize expressions by:
a. Performing operations on rational expressions
b. Performing operations on radical expressions
c. Applying properties of rational exponents
d. Applying properties of logarithms
e. Performing operations on complex numbers
II. Solve each of the following:
a. Absolute value equations
b. Quadratic equations
1. By factoring and identifying roots
2. By completing the square
3. Using the quadratic formula
c. Rational equations
d. Radical equations
e. Exponential equations
f. Logarithmic equations
g. Absolute value equations and inequalities
III. Solve linear and non-linear systems of two equations
a. Algebraically and/or;
b. Using a graphing utility, calculator or computer algebra system (CAS)
c. Apply knowledge of systems to find feasible regions
IV. Algebraically solve linear systems of equations in three variables
V. Recognize and graph elementary conics
a. Circle
b. Parabola
VI. Use technology such as a graphing utility, calculator or computer algebra system (CAS) to solve equations graphically
VII. Apply critical thinking and mathematical reasoning to analyze, translate and solve applied problems involving:
a. Quadratic
b. Rational
c. Radical
d. Exponential and
e. Logarithmic equations
VIII. Simplify or reorganize functions given a
a. Sum
b. Difference
c. Product
d. Quotient and
e. Composition of two functions
IX. Inspect and analyze a graph in order to
a. Determine if the graph represents a function or is a 1-to-1 function
b. Evaluate the function
c. Determine the domain and range of a function
d. Determine the max or min of a function
e. Find the inverse of a 1-1 function
X. Find the domain and range of the following functions:
a. Rational functions
b. Polynomial functions
c. Functions involving radicals
d. Exponential functions
XI. Apply coursework management skills and a growth mindset to succeed in this class.
XII. Make consistent and regular preparations to maximize learning inside and outside the classroom.

    

12. Typical Out-of-Class Assignments: Credit courses require two hours of independent work outside of class per unit of credit for each lecture hour, less for lab/activity classes.  List types of assignments, including library assignments.)

    

a. Reading Assignments: (Submit at least 2 examples)

1. Find and read an article utilizing measurements in scientific or engineering notation. State the numbers used in the article in both the given scientific/engineering form and in the equivalent standard decimal format. Describe why the authors chose to describe the numbers in this format rather than in standard decimal notation.

2. Read an article describing the growth and/or decline of different social media platforms such as MySpace, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter. Research historical records of user data per month and make independent tables for each company, clearly labeling your independent and dependent variables. Using a graphing calculator, Excel or Desmos (a free app that is a powerful graphing calculator) create a graph of each company’s growth curve. Explain the type of growth experienced by each company, the factors that led to this growth and any conditions that did or will hinder future growth. Model the data with a function that best fits the type of growth (linear, exponential or piecewise function) and make predictions with your model.

    

b. Writing, Problem Solving or Performance: (Submit at least 2 examples)

1. Solve applied mathematical problems that use exponential models. Example: Assume that on the day you were born, your uncle put $8,000 into an account that grew at a rate of 3.7% annual interest compounded continuously. How much money would you have in the account on your 21st birthday?

2. Solve an applied mathematics problem using a system of equations. Example: A wine company needs to blend a California wine with a 5% alcohol content and a French wine with a 9% alcohol content to obtain 200 gallons of wine with 6.5% alcohol content. How many gallons of each kind of wine must be used?

    

c. Other (Term projects, research papers, portfolios, etc.)


    

13. Required Materials:

a. All Textbooks, resources and other materials used in this course are College Level?

  Yes

  No

 

b. Representative college-level textbooks (for degree-applicable courses) or other print materials.

Book 1:

Author:

  Blitzer

Title:

  Intermediate Algebra for College Students

Publisher:

  Pearson

Date of Publication:

  2017

Edition:

  7th

Book 2:

Author:

  Marecek

Title:

  Intermediate Algebra

Publisher:

  OpenSTAX

Date of Publication:

  2017

Edition:

  1st

Book 3:

Author:

  

Title:

  

Publisher:

  

Date of Publication:

  

Edition:

  

Book 4:

Author:

  

Title:

  

Publisher:

  

Date of Publication:

  

Edition:

  

Book 5:

Author:

  

Title:

  

Publisher:

  

Date of Publication:

  

Edition:

  

c. Other materials and/or supplies required of students:

Scientific Calculator

 

Methods of Instruction

 

14a. Check all instructional methods used to present course content.

Lecture/Discussion

Laboratory and/or Activity

Distance Learning (requires supplemental form)

Other:

   Collaborative learning

 

14b. Provide specific examples for each method of instruction checked above; include a minimum of two examples total. Reference the course objective(s) addressed by instructional method(s). Explain both what the instructor and students are expected to be doing and experiencing.

Lecture/Discussion:
Using an interactive lecture format, the instructor will develop the concept of a function, function notation and domain and range. Instructor will begin with definitions and examples, then students will work in groups to evaluate sets of data, graphs and equations to determine if they represent functions and state the domain and range of each given example. The instructor will write the same sets of data, graphs and equations on whiteboards around the classroom and call on groups to share and write their solutions on the whiteboards.

Course Objectives Addressed: 6.) Utilize function notation, perform operations on functions, determine if a function is invertible, and find the inverse of functions both graphically and in function notation. 13.) Demonstrate fluency with mathematical vocabulary, terminology, and notation through written and oral presentation.

Collaborative Learning: Using an in-class small group collaborative learning activity, students will discuss the strategies for factoring different types of polynomial expressions and create a flow chart to help them determine the best approach. Given a list of polynomials, they will use their flow chart to determine the complete factorization. The instructor will circulate and ask clarifying questions as the students complete this task.

Course Objectives Addressed: 9.) Simplify and perform operations on algebraic expressions including polynomials, rational expressions, complex fractions, radicals, rational and integral exponents, and logarithms. 13.) Demonstrate fluency with mathematical vocabulary, terminology, and notation through written and oral presentation.

 

 

 

15. Methods of Assessing Student Learning  

 

15a.  Methods of Evaluation:

 

Essay Examinations

Objective Examinations

Problem Solving Examinations

Skill Demonstrations

Projects

 

Classroom Discussions

 

Reports

 

Other (explain below)

 

 

 

 

 

 

15b. Based upon course objectives, give examples of how student performance will be evaluated. Provide examples for each method checked above; include a minimum of two examples total.

 

 

 

Classroom Discussion/Project:
The following is an example of a classroom discussion that would lead into a group project started in class and finished for homework. The final product would be a group report turned in at the completion of the project. Student performance would be evaluated based on the detail provided about the students' specific project, each student's contribution to the group and the correctness of the solutions given. As a class, the instructor will facilitate a discussion about catapults and trajectories. Through the discussion the instructor will talk about the different ways to write an equation of a parabola. The class will then break up into small groups with the goal of finding an equation to model the trajectory of a catapult (catapult will be provided by the instructor). The groups will discuss and come up with a strategy for collecting data and then head outside to shoot the catapult and find data. Ultimately, each group will be asked to test the accuracy of their equations by determining where in the trajectory to place a basket or trash can so that a bouncy ball will land directly in the basket or trash can. The class will hold a competition at the end of the activity.

Each group will be given the following assignment:
a. Determine the information you would need to collect to model the trajectory of your catapult. Write out a plan for your group to find this information.
b. Head outside to shoot your catapult and collect data.
c. Using the data you collected, find a quadratic equation that models the trajectory of your catapult. Define your variables (x and y) and state the domain and range of the model.
d. Measure the height of the given objects (basket and/or trash cans) and then determine where to place the objects so that the bouncy ball will fall into them when launched. Include all calculations.
e. Test your predictions!

Objective/Problem Solving Examination:
The following is an example of a problem from an exam which would entail problem solving, written explanations and objective solutions. Student performance would be evaluated based on the correctness of the solutions and on the depth of understanding displayed in written explanations to the questions asked in the problem.

Using the data from the last several years of the ever increasing cost of a 30 second Super Bowl Ad:
a. Identify the independent and dependent variables.
b. Graph the data on a Cartesian coordinate system and label your axes and intercept(s). Write a sentence or two to describe the trend and the intercept(s) in context of the data given.
c. Draw a line of best fit through the points.
d. Determine the slope of the line through the years 2012 and 2017. Describe the slope in context.
e. Use the equation you found to predict the cost of a 30 second ad in 2025.
f. Do you think the trend will continue? At the same rate? Explain your reasoning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION C

 

1. Program Information:  

In an approved program.  

Part of a new program.

Not part of an approved program.  

2. Course TOP Code:

   Program title - TOP Code:  

Mathematics, General- 170100

 

3. Course SAM Code:

 A  Apprenticeship

 B  Advanced Occupational

 C  Clearly Occupational

 D  Possibly Occupational

 E  Non-Occupational

 

4. Faculty Discipline Assignment(s):

 

Mathematics

 

Comments:


 

     

 

SECTION D

 

General Education Information:  

1.  College Associate Degree GE Applicability:    


Math Competency
Communication & Analytic Thinking

2.  CSU GE Applicability (Recommended-requires CSU approval):



3.  IGETC Applicability (Recommended-requires CSU/UC approval):  



4. C-ID:  

  

 

 

SECTION E

 

Articulation Information:  (Required for Transferable courses only)

 1.  

 

CSU Transferable.  

UC Transferable.

CSU/UC major requirement.  

  

If CSU/UC major requirement, list campus and major. (Note: Must be lower division)

 

 


 2.

List at least one community college and its comparable course.  If requesting CSU and/or UC transferability also list a CSU/UC campus and comparable lower division course.

 

Mathematics 110 – Intermediate Algebra for Business, Math, Science AND Engineering Majors - Cuyamaca College

 

 

SECTION F

 

Planning and Resources - Please address the areas below:  

1. Evidence of Planning: connection to existing or planned degrees/certificates, place in general education; relationship to mission (basic skills, transfer, career technical education, lifelong learning); transfer university requirements; advisory/regional/national needs; or other planning considerations.

Required as a prerequisite for any transferable mathematics course, but specifically designed for B-STEM (Business, Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) students to prepare them for their future math and major courses. Additionally, it meets the Mathematics requirement for achieving an Associate Degree.


 
2. Potential Impact on Resources: faculty, facilities, computer support/lab, library, transportation, equipment, or other needs.
All math faculty members meet the minimum qualifications to teach this course, but it is taught using discovery based learning with B-STEM (Business, Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) applications. Therefore, professional development activities and training are necessary to equip faculty with the materials and pedagogy to effectively deliver the material.
 

 

 

SECTION G

1.  Maximum Class Size (recommended):              35

2.  If recommended class size is not standard, then provide rationale: